Kashmiri carpets are world famous for two things - they are hand made and knotted. Carpet weaving in Kashmir was not indigenous but is thought to have come from Persia. Most designs are mostly Persian with local variations. The color scheme of the carpets differentiate Kashmiri carpets from other carpets. The colors are subtle and muted. The knotting of a carpet is the most important aspect. In addition to the design 

of the carpet, the knots per square inch determines the durability and the value of a carpet.

Kashmiri carpets are world famous for two things - they are hand made and knotted. Carpet weaving in Kashmir was not indigenous but is thought to have come from Persia. Most designs are mostly Persian with local variations. The color scheme of the carpets differentiate Kashmiri carpets from other carpets. The colors are subtle and muted. The knotting of a carpet is the most important aspect. In addition to the design of the carpet, the knots per square inch determines the durability and the value of a carpet.

Stretched tightly on a frame is the warp of a carpet. The weft threads are passed through, the "talim" or design and color specifications are worked on this. A strand of yarn is looped through the warp and weft, knotted and then cut. The yarn used normally is silk, wool, or silk and wool. Woolen carpets always have a cotton base (warp & weft) and silk carpets usually have cotton base otherwise silk is used.

Kashmiri Carpets, the two words immediately weave a picture of enchanting designs in one's mind. Designs that are magical in transforming the appearance of a room.

The art of making carpets was introduced to Kashmir by the Mughals in the early 16th Century. A few local weavers mastered the skill and made it their meter. The artistry was passed from one generation to another within families. Not surprisingly, even today, centuries later, the traditional patterns of weaving are still in use.
 
A striking feature about these aesthetic wonders is that they are entirely made by human hand. The nimble fingers of the craftsman work at the loom with practiced ease while he actually sings out the pattern of the design (written in a special colour code called "Talim")